Profile Of A Champion: Sowing and Reaping

When I look back on my high school experience, Physics was disproportionately my least favourite class. I was completely disinterested and for that reason my grades suffered. I would be bored, I’d play on my phone, and I’d often fall asleep in class. I felt, like many students do, that Physics had no relevance in my life. If time is our most valuable asset, why was I wasting it learning about something I’d never use? What I failed to recognize at the time was that not only did the laws of Physics and the laws of nature matter, they were all that mattered.

Take Newton’s third law as an example. Newton’s third law describes the purpose of action and reaction in our experience. He said,

“For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.”

He was able to demonstrate in Physics that the size of the force on one object would equal the size of the force on a second object. Therefore the greater force applied in the primary action, the greater force experienced as a reaction. On top of that, it’s implied that if no force is applied in the first place, there is no cause for any reaction or result of any kind.

Sitting in that Physics class I didn’t see the big picture. In fact, it wasn’t until I was introduced to Jim Rohn that I fully grasped what it meant to leverage this law. To me, Jim was world class at simplifying ideas. Jim said the exact same thing in a slightly different way. In this life changing video, he demonstrates the powerful operating system that all the champions and high performers live their lives through. To phrase Newton’s Law as Jim would,

“Whatever you sow, you shall reap.”

Now that made sense! If the farmer didn’t sow his seeds in the spring, he reaped no harvest in the fall. But, if the farmer sowed day and night throughout the spring and tended to the weeds through the summer, a full harvest would virtually always follow. When I looked at my life from the lens of sowing and reaping, instead of Physics, I understood why I wasn’t reaping good. Unlike the champions, I didn’t have the action habit. I wasn’t working hard.  I wasn’t consistently applying force towards the accomplishment of a goal. I wasn’t taking the action required to sow the seeds of my future success.

Candidly, I was an average student, an average athlete, and I felt very depressed. I tried to blame my teachers, my school, and I’m ashamed to say it, even my parents. I didn’t realize what was causing such dismal results until I started to meet people who were reaping good. Until, on a consistent basis, I was surrounded by winners. By people who were taking action, sowing seeds and as a result, were reaping the benefits that virtually always follow.

For example, many of the fellows in Venture for Canada have been leveraging this law to reap fantastic harvests in their lives for years! In the March 2017 selection day I was asked to help facilitate a room of finalists. In that room I met one of the most impressive young professionals I’d ever seen. She was sharp, witty, and gave off the impression she was a seasoned veteran in high-stakes environments. I had a gut feeling from our brief introduction that she would rock the day and that I would see her a few months later as a member of our cohort. I was right.

Sam Sproule Headshot

Highly influenced by her parents, Sam Sproule was born in Rockland, Ottawa. In 2016, she graduated from Acadia University with a Business Administration Degree, majoring in Entrepreneurship and Innovation. Unsatisfied with the impact she left at the school, she successfully ran for President of the Acadia Students’ union for the 2016-2017 year. While being responsible for the Unions $2.5 million operating budget, she also advocated for the needs of students to all three levels of government, as well as, to the University through the Board of Governors and Senate. If that wasn’t enough action already, Sam took on a honours research project that has now laid the foundation for a entrepreneurship-focused living space on campus at Acadia University. Impressive? Yes. Possible without the massive and dedicated action towards her goals? No.

As I got the opportunity to get to know Sam better, I learned two things.

  1. She is one of the most humble people I know. She has accomplished so much and yet I had to pry hard to get to the specifics of her wins.
  2. She is an impressive relationship builder. I could see in her story, woven together like beautiful poetry, the cause and effects of building deep and meaningful relationships.

Sam demonstrated to me that in the life of the champion, the 5 Laws of Sowing and reaping always play out. In this profile you’ll learn how to avoid the grips of regret while simultaneously squeezing as much as possible out of this short life.

Sowing and Reaping Applied

First: The law of sowing and reaping is negative. 

Thistle for blog

If you sow bad, you reap bad. This is extremely basic, but it’s important to cover the basics. If you plant thistle seeds, you don’t get pumpkins. If you’re like me at sixteen and you plant mental seeds of insecurity, you don’t get confidence. If you plant seeds of deception through lies, you don’t get trust. Or if you plant no seeds through procrastination, you don’t get the results that come from taking action! Remember, the law is negative.

Second: The Law of sowing and reaping is positive.

Pumpkins for blog

If you sow good, you reap good. If you plant pumpkin seeds, you won’t get thistles! And the more I learned about Sam, the more I realized she was planting pumpkin seeds. Her whole life she’s been sowing seeds of trust, generosity, and hard work. When she decided to return to Acadia in the 2016-2017 school year, she had already spent three years developing a broad network and deep relationships throughout campus.

Despite never been on the Students’ Representative Council and being considered an underdog in the race, Sam applied to run as president. Typically, having served as a member of the Council would be expected, especially for one applying to become President. However, Sam’s narrative emphasizes the importance of sowing good seeds of reputation.

Sam had worked at the Union information desk and the school bar. She was on 24/7 attending events and meeting people. All the while showing up in life as sincere, hard working, and genuinely prepared to advocate for the students she would represent. In the end, against all odds, she sowed good and as a result was well deserving in her presidential election.

Third: You do not reap what you sow. But rather, you reap much more than you sow. 

Reaping more than you sow for blog

This is where the law of sowing and reaping gets exciting. The key here is more. You don’t get back what you put out, you get back much more than you put out. It’s important to remember that again, the law works both positive and negative. On the negative side it says, if you sow to the wind, you get the whirlwind. I found that to be true. A few years of negative thinking, an idle body, and being in the wrong environment, projected me into years of anxiety and depression. The darkest days of my life taught me profound lessons about protecting my mind and the criticality of sowing good seeds.

On the positive side, it’s clear that when the farmer plants his seeds of corn, kale, or apple trees he reaps an abundant harvest 10x what he planted. He doesn’t get back one apple, he experiences the joy of sharing generations of apples with his family. The same law proved true in Sam’s University life.

All of the hard work leading up to being President of the Student Union payed off.  But, becoming president was just the start. Sam was given more opportunities than she had ever imagined. She began to represent and advocate for over 20,000 students while working with Students Nova Scotia as well as over 250,000 Federally with the Canadian Alliance of Student Association. Here, Sam continued to build her reputation of working hard for student advocacy. Along with her team, she met with Members of the Legislative Assembly, Members of Parliament , and Senators to discuss priorities for students on accessibility, affordability, and affecting policy. This alone should be a fantastic motivator for all of us knowing that we do in fact reap more than we sow. But, there’s more.

Not only did those experiences themselves plant new seeds of skills and confidence, it continued to build upon the foundation and credibility she had started years prior. Still a student at the time, she was additionally dedicating her entire year to a seventy page research paper. Her paper would highlight entrepreneurship on campus and argue the benefits of creating a space for students to collaborate informally on projects of passions. Here we see the third law play out again!

If we only reaped what we sowed, having the entrepreneurial residence on campus come to fruition, because of her paper, would be the end of the story. But, again, there is much more. If it wasn’t for the reputation she had built and for the seeds she had sown while creating her honours paper, we never would have met! Her professor was so impressed by her work ethic that he introduced Sam to the Atlantic Program Director for Venture for Canada. Now a member of Venture for Canada she is set up to continue to receive an abundant harvest for years to come.

Fourth: You reap what you sow, but…

Rain of parade gif for blog

One thing better than the truth is the whole truth… Here’s the whole truth. You could lose. There are times when no matter how many seeds you plant, no matter how many relationships you build, and no matter how hard you work it doesn’t pay off. Remember the farmer?

The farmer plants his seed in the spring, come summer he works ten-twelve hours a day, six-seven days a week. He has the character of a champion and come fall he’s got a beautiful crop. Not to mention, he deserves every bit of it. But, the day before he sends the combines into the field, a hail storm comes and beats all of his crop into the ground. Which means, he lost! He did nothing wrong. It’s just that kind of planet. Sometimes it will hail on your crop and rain on your parade. Sometimes you lose, that’s part of life. But…

Last: If you don’t sow, you don’t reap. 

empty wallet

The biggest mistake I made with the law of sowing and reaping is that I had lost so many times I gave up trying. Never give up sowing good seeds! If you don’t sow, you don’t reap. You don’t even have a chance! It’s a tough to come to grips with the fact that no matter how hard we work we could lose. But what a tragedy it would be to run through life never really giving yourself a shot? Imagine the regret knowing that at the end of your life you never sowed the seeds of the life you truly desired.

You never met the girl. You never did that one gig for free that could have blown up your career. You never learned that language that could have opened your life up to unlimited possibilities. Avoiding regret and living like a champion is simple, but not easy. Sam shared that no matter your path, hard work will always be respected and appreciated. Make a decision today that you will plant the seeds of the future you desire. Otherwise, you may not get another chance.

Do this. 

For many, including myself, the law of sowing and reaping may not be clear at first. Most people can understand that they’re not reaping extraordinary results, but it doesn’t mean they know why. If you’re still confused like I was for a long time about how this all applies, the answer could be in the same quote written a different way.

“Whatever you reap is what you’ve sown.”

Now the problem is clear, we can go to work on improving our lives right away! Whatever you reap is what you’ve sown. If you don’t like the results, who do you look up? Answer, whoever planted it! And where can you find who planted your crop? Answer, in the mirror!

  1. Go to the mirror– When fall comes around we need to go to the mirror. Who’s responsible for what’s showing up in our lives? Whether we like the harvest or not, we’re responsible for planting the seeds of our lives. We need to take ownership of everything we do, have, and become. If you’re ecstatic about an abundant harvest that you’ve reaped, good. Document what’s working and triple down! If you’re unimpressed with the few skinny carrots you’ve delivered at the end of the day, good. It’s an opportunity for you to be honest with yourself about your work ethic, commitment, and focus. Then, take ownership and make it happen.
  2. Know what you want- It’s critical to understand what you’re after. If you don’t know what you want and the direction you want to take, there’s a high probability you won’t plant enough seeds into one specific priority, to achieve anything of substance. The champion is willing to focus their energies into a specific goal for weeks, months, and even years. Getting clear on what you want will allow you to invest your energy wisely.
  3. Be like Sam- Sam is a champion. And with each champion that I’ve interviewed, it’s clear they’ve all sown and invested huge amounts of time and resources into building strong relationships. If you’re going to remember one thing from this post, it’s to intentionally plant, and cultivate, deep personal and professional relationships. Almost all of Sam’s results, from becoming President of the Student Union, working with Governments, being introduced to Venture for Canada, and even to her current employment, has been the direct result of a relationship she had developed. Be like Sam and start sowing today!

Till next time, stay on the offensive. Aggressively pursue a better version of yourself. And remember what Jim Rohn said, “You cannot change the destination of your life overnight but you can change the direction.”

-J 

Out.

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