The Profile Of A Champion: Burning Desire

When you study people who are up to something, the first attitude necessary before anything is achieved is desire.

But, if that’s all it took, we’d have a whole lot more successful people in this world. Most people live with an illusion that they have a desire to achieve something. These people talk a big game, but their actions never reflect their word.

They say they want to make extra money, but instead of starting their part time business, they watch Netflix every night.

They say they want to get better grades, but instead of studying in the library, they go out for lunch everyday.

They say they want to lose ten pounds, but instead of working out in the gym, they’ve got Cheetos dust on their fingers.

I observe this false illusion of desire everyday. And I can quickly recognize it because I was once in those same shoes. So the question is, how is desire held for the champion vs those that are runner up?

Desire for the champion is an imperative of purpose. Their vision, their purpose, their goal is larger than you and I as individuals. From afar, I had observed this level of desire time and time again through the examples of athletes and business leaders. Yet, I had never seen it so pronounced until I spent two full weeks with the top Canadian graduates at Venture for Canada.

I remember on one of the first weekends of training camp we kayaked, canoed, and paddle boarded on lake Ontario. The sun was shinning, our skin slowly burning, and everyone was smiling looking forward to the day on the water. Other than myself, one of the only other people paddle boarding was a new friend I had made, Tyler Sellars. We had made small talk previous to the day on the water, but we had never really connected about what brought us to Venture for Canada and what our future plans were. In only thirty minutes, it was clear to me that Tyler obviously embodied the first attitude of the champion, desire.

Tyler Sellar Pic for blog

Born in Moncton New Brunswick, Tyler grew up in a family who built their careers in the financial industry. He told me about how privileged he was growing up. At a young age, he understood the opportunities that having money could provide for him and his family. Being accustomed to this life of prosperity, he was unprepared for what happened next.

In 2008, at fourteen years old, his entire family’s lives were flipped upside down by the greatest financial crisis since the depression. In less than a year they went from comfortable living, to working pay-check to pay-check. With all the same bills to pay, no one was hiring his dad. They lived for years with little income. Becoming increasingly more difficult to pay for their competitive soccer fees anymore, Tyler remembers standing outside local businesses begging for money to keep him on the field.

Imagine how disempowering that would feel.

The contrast between rich and poor weighed so heavily on him that it drove him to make a decision. 

Tyler shared with me that he made a decision that he would never live like that again. He made a decision that he would take ownership of his income, his freedom, and his life.

In those decisions, Tyler developed the first attitude of the profile of the champion, a burning desire. Following are the three reasons why we all need to cultivate a burning desire to achieve, and how to go about doing it.

1. Without desire there is no work ethic

I now understand why most people don’t have a burning desire. Most people’s goals are logical. For example people say , “Oh, if I could only scrape together enough money to pay my lousy bills.” If you’re only inspired to meet your needs, you’ll never cultivate the desire that will compel you to do great things. Needs are logical, but logical things don’t compel us to reach beyond our comfortable grasp. They won’t have you up early and working hard late into the night. Tyler on the other hand, set goals for complete financial freedom. He never wanted himself or his future family to ever experience what he went through. His goals were emotional, and they were lofty.

With those goals, in 2010, Tyler started his first business. He was going to school, playing competitive soccer like it was his full time job, and still making the time to build one of the early e-commerce drop -shipping businesses. At the end of a long day while most people would make an excuse as to why they were tired, or deserved to relax and watch TV, Tyler’s desire pushed him into action. He developed relationships with Japanese clothing manufacturers and sold both soccer equipment and men’s fashion. Around an already exhausting schedule, Tyler worked his ass off building a  profitable company.

The vast majority of us need an immediate gut check when it comes to our work ethic. Ask yourself, are you matching your work ethic with your level ambition? If not, why not? For most, it’s because they’ve yet to cultivate the level of desire of the champion.

2. Without desire there is no persistence

Achieving lofty goals is hard. Creating something from nothing is difficult. Do you think what you want is going to be easy to accomplish? Far more often than not, our goals will require more energy, more time and more money than expected.

The path you will travel down requires a desire that is nothing other than white hot. It’s about getting to a place in your life where you say this is it! Anything less than that, is tentative. And anytime you’re tentative, there is no power. Tyler on the other hand, surrendered to his purpose.

When eBay learned that he was selling on their platform underage, he was on the brink of being shutdown or forced to pay hefty fees for each transaction. Either way, the business was going to take a big hit. Like with any great achievement, he was confronted with a lot of problems. However, Tyler wasn’t engaged with his obstacles the same way as most. By surrendering to his purpose of providing financial security for his future, he was able to use his mind for him and not against him. Instead of quitting business forever, he looked for other avenues where he could make money. Tyler went on to create three more businesses over the next three years. Each business came with it’s opportunities as well as it’s own unique set of challenges. But because of Tyler’s burning desire, his perseverance lead to many new skills, profitability, and thicker skin.

“The reason success alludes so many people is that the road to our alter of riches is laden with obstacles.”

When you’re on the path to accomplish your goals, do you find yourself starting and stopping frequently? When there’s a roadblock, a challenge, or your goal required more resources than you expected, do you persist despite the obstacles? Or do you fold like a cheap suit? If you fold, check your desire. If it’s hot enough, you will persist past all obstacles on your road to riches.

3. Without desire you cannot prioritize

This week I’ve been asked to attend two different networking events, three coffee meetings, a speaking event and to go out for drinks and a trivia night. If you think about your schedule, I’m sure your time has been elicited just as much if not more! If you don’t have desire, a clear purpose, or a goal that moves you, when people ask for your time, you won’t have the gut to tell people no. Warren Buffet is famous for saying,

“the difference between successful people and really successful people is that really successful people say no to almost everything.”

The ability to prioritize is necessary in order to accomplish your goals. If you’re constantly being pulled in different directions, you’ll never direct enough energy into one thing to accomplish it. In order to build his businesses, Tyler needed a ridiculous work ethic, he needed to persist past his obstacles, but he also needed to say no to a lot of other things. There was so much power in his declaration to provide financial abundance for his future he was able to say no to leisure and yes to his goals. His desire had him in alignment with what was important. His desire kept him focused and in the end, his prioritization paid huge dividends in the success of the business.

What are you saying yes to? Are the activities your investing your time in going to get your closer to accomplishing your greatest desires? Or are you like Tyler and I, where you need to remember to say no to others, in order to say yes to yourself?

Do This. 

Now that we understand why the champion has a burning desire, we can start to cultivate it in our own lives. Here are 2 things to remember about building desire.

  1. Desire is triggered– It often waits and sleeps until you wake it. For Tyler, it was his family’s finances. But for you, maybe it’s a book, or a song, or a seminar, a conversation with a friend, a happening or an event. Who knows which one will turn it all on! What I do know is that you need to welcome every human experience. Sometimes from the most negative experiences comes the greatest awakening.
  2. Desire can be selfish- Never feel ashamed about your motivations as long as it works for you. If you’re not hurting anyone, and your desire fires you up, use it! Just because your neighbour is excited about ending cancer doesn’t mean that your desire to stick it to your brother isn’t a good one. Whatever gets you angry enough, excited enough, passionate enough, or determined enough to start working hard and persist through your obstacles, is a worthwhile desire and you need to take full advantage of how it makes you feel.

A burning desire is the first attitude of the champion for a reason. Without it, you won’t work hard enough. You won’t persist long enough. And you won’t be willing to say no to others when it comes down to focusing on your own goals. If you want the respect, mastery, and character that comes with being a champion, cultivate your desire and never let that fire extinguish. 

Till next time, stay on the offensive. Aggressively pursue a better version of yourself. And remember what Jim Rohn said, “you cannot change the destination of your life overnight, but you can change your direction.”

-J

Out.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s